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The War Garden Victorious - Appendix 1
Victory Edition 1919 WAR GARDENING and Home Storage of Vegetables


CONTENTS

 

Title

I.

How the National War Garden Commission Came into Being

II.

The Story of the War Garden

III.

How War Gardens Helped

IV.

Types of War Gardens

V.

Uncle Sam's First War Garden

VI.

How Big Business Helped

VII.

How the Railroads Helped

VIII.

The Army of School Gardeners

IX.

Community Gardening

X.

Cooperation in Gardening

XI.

War Gardens as City Assets

XII.

The Part Played by Daylight Saving

XIII.

The Future of War Gardening

XIV.

Conserving the Garden Surplus

XV.

Community Conservation

XVI.

Conservation by Drying

XVII.

Why We Should Use Dried Foods

XVIII.

The Future of Dehydration

XIX.

Cooperation of the Press
  Chapter 19 - Cartoon Illustrations
   
 

APPENDIX

  "War Gardening,"
Victory Edition, 1919
INDEX
Cover / Letters / 1 / 2 / 3 / 4 / 5 / 6 / 7 / 8 / 9 / 10 / 11 / 12 / 13 / 14 / 15 / 16 / 17 / 18 / 19 / 20 / 21 / 22 / 23 / 24 / 25 / 26 / 27 / 28 / 29 / 30 / 31 / 32
More Letters / Back

 
  "Home Canning and Drying," Victory Edition, 1919
INDEX
Cover / Letters / 1 / 2 / 3 / 4 / 5 / 6 / 7 / 8 / 9 / 10 / 11 / 12 / 13 / 14 / 15 / 16 / 17 / 18 / 19 / 20 / 21 / 22 / 23 / 24 / 25 / 26 / 27 / 28 / 29 / 30 / 31 / 32
More Letters / Back
 
 


Color Plates

  Sow the Seeds of Victory - Every Garden a Munition PlantWILL YOU HAVE A PART IN VICTORY?

"Every Garden a Munition Plant"

James Montgomery Flagg


  War Garden Victorious Poster - War Gardens Over The TopA Poster Spreading the Idea of Militant War Gardens

Maginel Wright Enright


  War Garden Victorious Poster - Every Garden a Peace PlantA Poster for 1919, Symbolic of Victory

Maginel Wright Enright


  War Garden Victorious Poster - Can Vegetables, Fruits and the Kaiser tooCAN VEGETABLES, FRUIT AND THE KAISER TOO

J. Paul Verrees

A Poster Which Was Used in 1918, and Which, Amended–Following Germany's Defeat–Was Also Forceful in 1919

   
 

OTHER POSTERS

  We can can vegetables, fruti and the Kaiser too We can can Vegetables Fruit and the Kaiser too

 

 

page 9

HOW MUCH SEED TO BUY

     The following amounts of seed will plant in each case a garden row 100 feet long. Measure your rows and buy according. Also compare your figures with planting table on page 23.

String beans...........................1/2 to 1 pint
Lima beans............................1/2 to 1 pint
Cabbage...................................1/4 ounce
Carrot..........................................1 ounce
Cauliflower.................................1 packet
Celery.......................................1/4 ounce
All squash.................................1/2 ounce
Beets..........................................2 ounces
Sweet corn...................................1/2 pint
Lettuce......................................1/2 ounce
Muskmelon................................1/2 ounce
Cucumber..................................1/2 ounce
Eggplant...................................1/2 ounce
Kale, or Swiss chard................1/2 ounce
Parsley.....................................1/4 ounce
Parsnip.....................................1/2 ounce
Vegetable oyster (salsify)..........1/2 ounce
Onion sets (bulbs).........................1 quart
Onion seed..................................1 ounce
Peas.......................................1 to 2 pints
Radish.........................................1 ounce
Spinach.......................................1 ounce
Tomatoes.................................1/8 ounce
Turnip....................................... 1/2 ounce
     1 or 2 pecks of early potatoes and 1/2 to 1 bushel of late potatoes are enough to plant to supply four persons.

drawing of paper band folded into bottomless seed starter

Fig. 7––A paper band folded into the form of a berry box, without bottom, is a good holder for indoor seed planting. The picture shows how these are placed side by side in a flat box.

     To test plant 25 to 50 seed of each variety in an indoor seed box, or place between moist blotters or cloth between two plates (Fig. 5.) Germination should take place within 2 to 8 days and the number of seedlings which grow will show the percentage of germination.
     The seedlings should be kept for planting to prevent waste.
     The standard adopted by the United States Department of Agriculture for seed germination is as follows:

Should Produce 60 to 80 per cent:
Celery, Parsley, Salsify, Eggplant, Parsnip.
Should Produce 80 to 85 per cent:
Asparagus, Okra, Spinach, Carrot, Onion, Cauliflower, Pepper.
Should Produce 85 to 90 per cent:
Corn (sweet), Lettuce, Squash, Cress, Melon, Tomato, Cucumber, Pumpkin.
Should Produce 90 to 95 per cent:
Bean, Mustard, Turnip, Cabbage, Pea, Radish.

INDOOR PLANTING

     Earlier crops can be secured by planting certain seed indoors and setting the young plants out in the open garden after the weather becomes warm. This may be done with tomatoes, cabbage, lettuce, cauliflower, peppers, and eggplant.
     Any wooden box, shallow and wide, will make an indoor garden. Put 1 inch of gravel or cinders in the bottom for drainage, and fill to the top with good soil. Rows of plants may be two inches apart.

drawing of seed box for starting plants indoors

Fig. 9––Seed box for starting plants indoors.

 

     Plant 8 or 10 seed to the inch, keep the soil damp, and set the box in a window. When the plants are an inch high transplant them to other seed boxes, spacing plants 2 inches apart. This insures sturdy plants with good root systems.

Transplanting

     Before transplanting the plants to the garden set the box outdoors, in mild weather, to harden the plants. Set out each plant with a ball of the box dirt sticking to the roots. Thorough watering several hours before transplanting causes the earth to stick as required.
     If the root system is broken in the removal trim away some of the larger leaves of the plants. In moist ground open a hole with trowel or dibble. Make the hole larger than is needed to hold the roots and a little deeper than the roots grew. Place roots in hole, and with the hands, pack the soil firmly around the plant. In dry soil pour a pint of water into each hole before inserting plant. Rake some dry earth about the surface surrounding each plant to hold the moisture.
     Transplanted plants cannot stand strong sunshine at first and cloudy days or late afternoon are preferable for transplanting. In bright weather place newspapers over them for a day or two, making tents of the papers, in the shape of an inverted V.
     A homemade paper pot, a round, bottomless paper band or a berry box, filled with soil should be used to produce plants for a hill of cucumbers, squash, melons or other "vining" plants which are started indoors, as these do not stand transplanting if the roots are disturbed. The pot or other holder may be set into the ground without disturbing the roots. Tomatoes, eggplants and beans may also be started in this way.

drawing of transplanting tomato plant

Fig. 8––Transplanting tomato plant from post to garden.

* [ed. note] see Mulch, Intensive and Lazy Gardening Books for alternative methods of preparing the soil and planting.

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