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The War Garden Victorious - Appendix 1
Victory Edition 1919 WAR GARDENING and Home Storage of Vegetables


CONTENTS

 

Title

I.

How the National War Garden Commission Came into Being

II.

The Story of the War Garden

III.

How War Gardens Helped

IV.

Types of War Gardens

V.

Uncle Sam's First War Garden

VI.

How Big Business Helped

VII.

How the Railroads Helped

VIII.

The Army of School Gardeners

IX.

Community Gardening

X.

Cooperation in Gardening

XI.

War Gardens as City Assets

XII.

The Part Played by Daylight Saving

XIII.

The Future of War Gardening

XIV.

Conserving the Garden Surplus

XV.

Community Conservation

XVI.

Conservation by Drying

XVII.

Why We Should Use Dried Foods

XVIII.

The Future of Dehydration

XIX.

Cooperation of the Press
  Chapter 19 - Cartoon Illustrations
   
 

APPENDIX

  "War Gardening,"
Victory Edition, 1919
INDEX
Cover / Letters / 1 / 2 / 3 / 4 / 5 / 6 / 7 / 8 / 9 / 10 / 11 / 12 / 13 / 14 / 15 / 16 / 17 / 18 / 19 / 20 / 21 / 22 / 23 / 24 / 25 / 26 / 27 / 28 / 29 / 30 / 31 / 32
More Letters / Back

 
  "Home Canning and Drying," Victory Edition, 1919
INDEX
Cover / Letters / 1 / 2 / 3 / 4 / 5 / 6 / 7 / 8 / 9 / 10 / 11 / 12 / 13 / 14 / 15 / 16 / 17 / 18 / 19 / 20 / 21 / 22 / 23 / 24 / 25 / 26 / 27 / 28 / 29 / 30 / 31 / 32
More Letters / Back
 
 


Color Plates

  Sow the Seeds of Victory - Every Garden a Munition PlantWILL YOU HAVE A PART IN VICTORY?

"Every Garden a Munition Plant"

James Montgomery Flagg


  War Garden Victorious Poster - War Gardens Over The TopA Poster Spreading the Idea of Militant War Gardens

Maginel Wright Enright


  War Garden Victorious Poster - Every Garden a Peace PlantA Poster for 1919, Symbolic of Victory

Maginel Wright Enright


  War Garden Victorious Poster - Can Vegetables, Fruits and the Kaiser tooCAN VEGETABLES, FRUIT AND THE KAISER TOO

J. Paul Verrees

A Poster Which Was Used in 1918, and Which, Amended芳ollowing Germany's Defeat妨as Also Forceful in 1919

   
 

OTHER POSTERS

  We can can vegetables, fruti and the Kaiser too We can can Vegetables Fruit and the Kaiser too

 

 

page 32

SEED MATURING IN TWO YEARS

     Such vegetables as beets, carrots, parsnip, salsify, cabbage, etc., which require one season in which to grow will produce seed in the second year. Seeds of beets, carrots, cauliflower, turnips and late radishes are not often grown satisfactorily in the home garden. They must be carefully stored during the winter. Root crops of late planting are most satisfactory for seed. Select those of the best shape, color and size. Cut off all but an inch or two of the leaf stems and store in a frost proof pit or cellar. If a cellar is used protect the roots from withering by putting them in sand, fine soil or sifted coal ashes. They should be kept very slightly moist. Do not store them in a heated cellar.

CABBAGE末In the fall select the best heads, pull up entire plants and store them in a trench. Next spring set out two or more plants as one plant alone rarely produces seed. It may be necessary to cut the head across the top to allow the seed stalk to develop. When the seed pods turn yellow cut off the stalk and lay it on paper in a cool shady place to dry; early morning is the best time to gather. Rub out the seed when the pod is dry. Do not grow kale, collards, cabbage or kohlrabi末any two of them末in the same garden, as they will cross-fertilize.

 

ONIONS末Seed bearing bulbs should be well rooted. In the fall plant them 3 inches deep. As cold weather approaches cover with earth to protect them from freezing. In the spring remove the ridges. The seed stalks should be supported with stakes. When most of the seed is ripe cut out the seed stalks, dry in the sunshine and rub out the seed.

PARSNIPS末These may be left in the ground all winter. In the spring plant selected roots 3 to 5 feet apart in row. When see are ripe cut seed stalk and dry.

STORAGE OF SEED

     Put heavy seed, such as beans and peas, in cloth bags; smaller seed in paper bags or envelopes. Label each bag carefully, inside and out, as to contents. To protect seed from mice put the bags in perforated tin boxes. A bread box makes an ideal storage place for seed. An upstairs room or attic room, provided it is not warm, is a very good place in which to store seed. The room must be dry and well ventilated to prevent molding.
     Stored seed should be occasionally examined for insects. [content edited - see Seed Starting, Seed Saving and Plant Propagation for more modern techniques. ED.]


     This manual was prepared by the Commission's experts and is based on their own research and experience, supplemented by information procured from the United States Department of Agriculture, Agricultural Colleges, Experiment Stations, and other sources.

     The National War Garden Commission, wishing to do all within its power to aid the War Industries Board in the very necessary economy in the use of paper, has limited the edition of this book and asks those who receive it in quantity to make the most careful distribution so that the book may reach the hands of none but those who will use it. IF THE INDIVIDUAL RECIPIENT CAN NOT USE THIS BOOK IT IS URGED THAT IT BE HANDED TO SOME ONE WHO WILL USE IT.


TABLE OF CONTENTS

Cold frame and Hotbed.........................7
Community gardening............................1
Community storage..............................24
Cultivation...........................................11
DISEASES AND INSECTS...............17
FERTILIZERS末
   Commercial..................................... ..5
   Compost............................................5
   Green manure.................................. ..6
INDOOR PLANTING.........................9
PLANTING末
   Continuous crops..............................11
   Fall crops.........................................10
   Succession of crops..........................10
   Table for planting..............................23
   Time of planting................................10
 

POTATOES末
   Growing............................................12
   Diseases and insect............................21
   Storage.............................................28
POTATOES, SWEET末
   Growing.............................................13
   Storage..............................................29
SEED末
   Quantity to buy.....................................9
   Saving for next year.............................30
   Testing before planting...........................8
SPRAYING............................................16
STORAGE末
   Apples................................................29
   Cellar..................................................24
   Outdoor cellar......................................27
   Pit......................................................26
   Seed...................................................32
   Various methods..................................27
TOOLS....................................................7

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