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The War Garden Victorious - Appendix 1I
Victory Edition 1919 HOME CANNING & DRYING of Vegetables & Fruits


CONTENTS

 

Title

I.

How the National War Garden Commission Came into Being

II.

The Story of the War Garden

III.

How War Gardens Helped

IV.

Types of War Gardens

V.

Uncle Sam's First War Garden

VI.

How Big Business Helped

VII.

How the Railroads Helped

VIII.

The Army of School Gardeners

IX.

Community Gardening

X.

Cooperation in Gardening

XI.

War Gardens as City Assets

XII.

The Part Played by Daylight Saving

XIII.

The Future of War Gardening

XIV.

Conserving the Garden Surplus

XV.

Community Conservation

XVI.

Conservation by Drying

XVII.

Why We Should Use Dried Foods

XVIII.

The Future of Dehydration

XIX.

Cooperation of the Press
  Chapter 19 - Cartoon Illustrations
   
 

APPENDIX

  "War Gardening,"
Victory Edition, 1919
INDEX
Cover / Letters / 1 / 2 / 3 / 4 / 5 / 6 / 7 / 8 / 9 / 10 / 11 / 12 / 13 / 14 / 15 / 16 / 17 / 18 / 19 / 20 / 21 / 22 / 23 / 24 / 25 / 26 / 27 / 28 / 29 / 30 / 31 / 32
More Letters / Back

 
  "Home Canning and Drying," Victory Edition, 1919
INDEX
Cover / Letters / 1 / 2 / 3 / 4 / 5 / 6 / 7 / 8 / 9 / 10 / 11 / 12 / 13 / 14 / 15 / 16 / 17 / 18 / 19 / 20 / 21 / 22 / 23 / 24 / 25 / 26 / 27 / 28 / 29 / 30 / 31 / 32
More Letters / Back
 
 


Color Plates

  Sow the Seeds of Victory - Every Garden a Munition PlantWILL YOU HAVE A PART IN VICTORY?

"Every Garden a Munition Plant"

James Montgomery Flagg


  War Garden Victorious Poster - War Gardens Over The TopA Poster Spreading the Idea of Militant War Gardens

Maginel Wright Enright


  War Garden Victorious Poster - Every Garden a Peace PlantA Poster for 1919, Symbolic of Victory

Maginel Wright Enright


  War Garden Victorious Poster - Can Vegetables, Fruits and the Kaiser tooCAN VEGETABLES, FRUIT AND THE KAISER TOO

J. Paul Verrees

A Poster Which Was Used in 1918, and Which, Amended–Following Germany's Defeat–Was Also Forceful in 1919

   
 

OTHER POSTERS

  We can can vegetables, fruti and the Kaiser too We can can Vegetables Fruit and the Kaiser too

 

 

page 28

HOME DRYING MANUAL
DRY ALL FOOD THAN CAN BE
DRIED

DIRECTIONS FOR FRUIT DRYING

Peaches

   Select fruit which is uniformly and fully ripe. Cut open with a sharp knife and remove the pits. Peaches are not usually pared, as the juice is lost by dripping if this is done. To sulphur arrange in single layers on trays with the pit surface up. Sulphuring will take from 1-2 hours and is complete when the juice collects in the pit. Care must be taken when transferring trays to drier to prevent loss of juice.
   Start drying at a temperature of 130° to 145° F. and raise it gradually to 165° F. when the process is nearly completed.
   Properly dried peaches are pliable and leathery.

Plums

   Select fruit which is ripe. Remove pits by cutting fruit open with a sharp knife. Arrange halves on trays in single layer with pit cavity uppermost.
   Treat with sulphur fumes 20 to 25 minutes. When liquid collects in the pit cavity the plums are sulphured enough, and are ready to dry. Start drying at a temperature of 130° to 145° F. When the surface begins to wrinkle increase slowly to 175°.

 

Prunes*

   Prunes which are fully ripe and have fallen from the trees are best fro drying. Grade and dip into boiling lye for 16 to 20 seconds. Allow 1 oz. lye to 2 gallons water. When dipped long enough there will be a slight indication of cracking of the skin near the stem end, but the skin will not be broken. Too strong lye or too long a dip will cause the skin to split and peel off.
   Rinse thoroughly in cold water and then spread on drying trays in single layers. Start drying at 130° F. and when the surface begins to wrinkle, raise the temperature very gradually to 175° F. Properly dried prunes show no moisture when cut or when pressed between the fingers.

 

TABLE FOR BLANCHING AND DRYING

   The following table shows blanching time for vegetables and temperatures to be used in drying by artificial heat.

 Vegetables


 

Beets
Cabbage
Carrots
Cauliflower
Celery
Figs
Garden peas
Green string beans
Lima beans
Okra
Onions
Parsnips
Potatoes
Prunes
Pumpkin and Winter squash
Spinach
Summer squash
Sweet corn
Sweet potatoes
Tomatoes
Turnips
Wax Beans

Fruits

Apples
Apricots
Berries
Cherries
Peaches
Pears
Plums

 

Blanching Time  Temperature (F)


Minutes               Degrees

2                          120 to 145
3 to 4                   115 to 135
2                          120 to 145
4 to 6                   120 to 130
2 to 3                              135
.........                    120 to 140 
3 to 5                    115 to 140
5 to 8                    130 to 145
3                                  150
3                           115 to 135
..........                          140
2                           120 to 145
2 to 3                    125 to 150
..........                   130 to 175
3 to 6                    135 to 160
2                                  130
3 to 6                    135 to 160
8 to 12                  130 to 140
6 to 8                    145 to 165
1-1/2                    120 to 140
1 to 2                    135 to 165
3                                  150

 

.............................130 to 175
.............................130 to 165
.............................130 to 155
.............................130 to 150
.............................130 to 165
.............................130 to 175
.............................130 to 165

   The exact time for Drying cannot be given. Individual judgment must be used following the directions in "Details of Drying," on page 22 and the directions on pages 25, 26, 27 and 28.
* Home Drying of Food a pdf manual by Utah State Extension gives several  alternative pretreatment methods for drying fruits and modern methods of drying foods.

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