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The War Garden Victorious - Appendix 1I
Victory Edition 1919 HOME CANNING & DRYING of Vegetables & Fruits


CONTENTS

 

Title

I.

How the National War Garden Commission Came into Being

II.

The Story of the War Garden

III.

How War Gardens Helped

IV.

Types of War Gardens

V.

Uncle Sam's First War Garden

VI.

How Big Business Helped

VII.

How the Railroads Helped

VIII.

The Army of School Gardeners

IX.

Community Gardening

X.

Cooperation in Gardening

XI.

War Gardens as City Assets

XII.

The Part Played by Daylight Saving

XIII.

The Future of War Gardening

XIV.

Conserving the Garden Surplus

XV.

Community Conservation

XVI.

Conservation by Drying

XVII.

Why We Should Use Dried Foods

XVIII.

The Future of Dehydration

XIX.

Cooperation of the Press
  Chapter 19 - Cartoon Illustrations
   
 

APPENDIX

  "War Gardening,"
Victory Edition, 1919
INDEX
Cover / Letters / 1 / 2 / 3 / 4 / 5 / 6 / 7 / 8 / 9 / 10 / 11 / 12 / 13 / 14 / 15 / 16 / 17 / 18 / 19 / 20 / 21 / 22 / 23 / 24 / 25 / 26 / 27 / 28 / 29 / 30 / 31 / 32
More Letters / Back

 
  "Home Canning and Drying," Victory Edition, 1919
INDEX
Cover / Letters / 1 / 2 / 3 / 4 / 5 / 6 / 7 / 8 / 9 / 10 / 11 / 12 / 13 / 14 / 15 / 16 / 17 / 18 / 19 / 20 / 21 / 22 / 23 / 24 / 25 / 26 / 27 / 28 / 29 / 30 / 31 / 32
More Letters / Back
 
 


Color Plates

  Sow the Seeds of Victory - Every Garden a Munition PlantWILL YOU HAVE A PART IN VICTORY?

"Every Garden a Munition Plant"

James Montgomery Flagg


  War Garden Victorious Poster - War Gardens Over The TopA Poster Spreading the Idea of Militant War Gardens

Maginel Wright Enright


  War Garden Victorious Poster - Every Garden a Peace PlantA Poster for 1919, Symbolic of Victory

Maginel Wright Enright


  War Garden Victorious Poster - Can Vegetables, Fruits and the Kaiser tooCAN VEGETABLES, FRUIT AND THE KAISER TOO

J. Paul Verrees

A Poster Which Was Used in 1918, and Which, Amended–Following Germany's Defeat–Was Also Forceful in 1919

   
 

OTHER POSTERS

  We can can vegetables, fruti and the Kaiser too We can can Vegetables Fruit and the Kaiser too

 

 

page 23

HOME DRYING MANUAL
DRY ALL FOOD THAN CAN BE
DRIED

Series of trays enclosed in wall-board box, for use with electric fan.
Fig. 15. Series of trays enclosed in wall-board box, for use with electric fan.

BLANCHING

   Blanching is desirable for successful vegetable Drying. Blanching gives more thorough cleansing, removes objectionable odors and flavors, kills protoplasm and softens and loosens the fiber, allowing quicker and more uniform evaporation of the moisture, stops destructive chemical changes, and gives better color. It is done by placing the vegetables in a piece of cheesecloth, a wire basket or other porous container and plunging them into boiling water A more desirable way is to blanch in steam. For small quantities a pail or deep kettle is serviceable. A false bottom raised an inch or more is necessary. Upon this rests a wire basket or cheesecloth filled with the prepared vegetables. The water should be just below the false bottom and be boiling vigorously when the products are put in. Cover with a tight-fitting cover. Keep the water boiling during the blanching period. For larger quantities a wash-boiler partially filled with water is convenient. Bricks set on end or a wooden frame raised a few inches above the water make good supports for the containers.

Meat Chopper for preparing vegetables.
Fig. 16. Meat Chopper for preparing vegetables.

   Do not continue blanching longer than the prescribed time as some of the valuable constituents will dissolve out, the color will be destroyed and the starch will be partially cooked to a paste.
   The time required is short and varies with different vegetables. For the proper time in each case consult the directions given for Drying on pages 25, 26, 27 and 28 and the time-table on page 28.
   After blanching, drain to remove moisture and arrange on trays.

DANGER FROM INSECTS

   In addition to exercising great care to protect vegetables and fruits from insects during the Drying process, precautions should be taken with teh finished product to prevent the hatching of eggs that may have been deposited. One measure that is useful is to subject the dried material to a heat of 180° F. for from 5 to 10 minutes. By the application of this heat the eggs will be killed. Be careful not to apply heat long enough to damage the product. Store as soon as removed from the oven.

"CONDITION"
BEFORE STORING

   The word "conditioning" as used in connection with drying vegetables and fruits simply means "thorough drying." It indicates the after treatment of products on their removal from the drying trays.

Crout slicer.
Fig. 17. Crout slicer.

   Put the dried products in bins, boxes, or, if the quantity is small, in bowls. Once a day for a period of ten days to two weeks, stir thoroughly or pour from one box to another. The containers should be in a clean, dry room, and protected from light and insects. Shutters and screens at the window are desirable. Otherwise protect the dried food by spreading clean cloths over it. If any part of the material is found to be moist, after this process, return it to the drier for a short time. When for several days no change in the moisture content has been noticed, and therefore no extra drying has been necessary, the products are ready to be stored.
   Properly conditioned products can be stored without danger of spoiling, because spores and fungi cannot begin growth if there is uniform freedom from moisture on the surface.
   PRACTICALLY ALL DRIED PRODUCTS SHOULD BE CONDITIONED.

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