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The War Garden Victorious - Appendix 1I
Victory Edition 1919 HOME CANNING & DRYING of Vegetables & Fruits


CONTENTS

 

Title

I.

How the National War Garden Commission Came into Being

II.

The Story of the War Garden

III.

How War Gardens Helped

IV.

Types of War Gardens

V.

Uncle Sam's First War Garden

VI.

How Big Business Helped

VII.

How the Railroads Helped

VIII.

The Army of School Gardeners

IX.

Community Gardening

X.

Cooperation in Gardening

XI.

War Gardens as City Assets

XII.

The Part Played by Daylight Saving

XIII.

The Future of War Gardening

XIV.

Conserving the Garden Surplus

XV.

Community Conservation

XVI.

Conservation by Drying

XVII.

Why We Should Use Dried Foods

XVIII.

The Future of Dehydration

XIX.

Cooperation of the Press
  Chapter 19 - Cartoon Illustrations
   
 

APPENDIX

  "War Gardening,"
Victory Edition, 1919
INDEX
Cover / Letters / 1 / 2 / 3 / 4 / 5 / 6 / 7 / 8 / 9 / 10 / 11 / 12 / 13 / 14 / 15 / 16 / 17 / 18 / 19 / 20 / 21 / 22 / 23 / 24 / 25 / 26 / 27 / 28 / 29 / 30 / 31 / 32
More Letters / Back

 
  "Home Canning and Drying," Victory Edition, 1919
INDEX
Cover / Letters / 1 / 2 / 3 / 4 / 5 / 6 / 7 / 8 / 9 / 10 / 11 / 12 / 13 / 14 / 15 / 16 / 17 / 18 / 19 / 20 / 21 / 22 / 23 / 24 / 25 / 26 / 27 / 28 / 29 / 30 / 31 / 32
More Letters / Back
 
 


Color Plates

  Sow the Seeds of Victory - Every Garden a Munition PlantWILL YOU HAVE A PART IN VICTORY?

"Every Garden a Munition Plant"

James Montgomery Flagg


  War Garden Victorious Poster - War Gardens Over The TopA Poster Spreading the Idea of Militant War Gardens

Maginel Wright Enright


  War Garden Victorious Poster - Every Garden a Peace PlantA Poster for 1919, Symbolic of Victory

Maginel Wright Enright


  War Garden Victorious Poster - Can Vegetables, Fruits and the Kaiser tooCAN VEGETABLES, FRUIT AND THE KAISER TOO

J. Paul Verrees

A Poster Which Was Used in 1918, and Which, Amended–Following Germany's Defeat–Was Also Forceful in 1919

   
 

OTHER POSTERS

  We can can vegetables, fruti and the Kaiser too We can can Vegetables Fruit and the Kaiser too

 

 

page 20

HOME DRYING MANUAL
DRY ALL FOOD THAN CAN BE
DRIED

  DRYING BY
ARTIFICIAL HEAT

   Drying by artificial heat is done in the oven or on top of a cookstove or range, in trays suspended over the stove or in a specially constructed drier built at home or purchased.
   When drying with artificial heat a thermometer must be used. This should be placed in the drier and frequently observed.

OVEN DRYING

   The simplest form of Oven Drying is to place small quantities of foodstuffs on plates in a slow oven. In this way leftovers and other bits of food may be saved for winter use with slight trouble and dried while the top of the stove is being used. This is especially effective for sweet corn. A few sweet potatoes, apples or peas, or even a single turnip, may be dried and saved. To keep the heat from being too great leave the oven door partially open. For oven use a simple tray may be made of galvanized wire screen of convenient size, with the edges bent up for an inch or two on each side. At each corner this tray should have a leg an inch or two in length, to hold it up from the bottom of the oven and permit circulation of air around the product.
   An oven drier which can be bought at a low price is shown in Fig. 5

.Commercial drier for use in oven.
Fig. 5. Commercial drier for use in oven.

Commercial drier - use over cookstove or lamp
Fig. 6. Commercial drier which may be
placed on top of cookstove or suspended over a lamp.

DRYING ON TOP OF
OR OVER STOVE

   An effective Drier for use over a stove or range may be made easily at home. Such a Drier is shown in Fig. 9. For the frame use strips of wood 1/2-inch thick and 2 inches wide. The trays or shelves are made of galvanized wire screen of small mesh tacked to the supports; or separate trays, sliding on strips attached to the framework, are desirable. This Drier may be suspended from the ceiling over the kitchen stove or range, or over an oil, gasoline, or gas stove, and it may be used while cooking is being done. If an oil stove is used there must be a tin or galvanized iron bottom 4 inches below the lowest tray, to prevent the fumes of the oil from reaching and passing through the material which is be dried, an to distribute the heat. A bottom of this kind may be easily attached to any Drier, either home-made or commercial. A framework crane as shown in Fig. 9 makes it possible for this Drier to be swung aside when not in use.
   In Fig. 8 is shown another form of Homemade Cookstove Drier, more pretentious than that shown in Fig. 9, but still easily and cheaply made. A good size for this is:  base, 16 by 24 inches; height, 36 inches. The lower part or supporting framework, 6 inches high, is made of galvanized sheet iron, slightly flaring toward the bottom, and with two ventilating holes in each of the four sides. The frame, which rests on this base, is made of strips of wood 1 or 1-1/2 inches wide. Wooden strips, 1-1/4 inches wide, and 3 inches apart, serve to brace the sides and furnish supports for the trays.

Commercial drier for use on stove.
Fig. 7. Commercial drier for use on stove.

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