home bookshop feed the hungry   earthly pursuits logo
what's new old book library safe seed pledge  
contact about books about food & recipes  
links I  II   garden tips  
search flower language blether  
  alphabetized flowers     flowers by meaning companion planting  
 
bookcases     
  
 
    click here to make a
"free" contribution to earthly pursuits

Vegetables :


 

THE OLD AND THE NEW IN CORN CULTURE


THE OLD AND THE NEW
IN CORN CULTURE

Page

 
1

Corn The Great American Cereal
Corn and the Early Colonies

2 Corn and the Indian
3a Photos - Corn & Tools
3b Photos - Indians in corn fields
4a Photos - Corn Drying & Hopi field
4b Photos - Mortar and Pestles
5 Kinds of Corn Grown by the Indians.
6 Primitive Seed-testing Methods.
The Nettle Seed Tester
7 Primitive Corn-Planting Methods
8 Indian Cornfields
Primitive Tools
9 Plants as Indicators of the Season
10 Seed Selection and Storing
11

Indian Corn Foods

12

Primitive and Modern Methods of Culture
13 Corn and the Westward Movement
14 Corn and the Packing Industry
15 The Silo and the Corn Crop
16 Variations of the Corn Plant
17 Corn and the Struggle for Democracy

 

 

From the Yearbook of the United States Department of Agriculture 1918
page 7

By H. Howard Biggar,
Office of Corn Investigations, Bureau of Plant Industry.

PRIMITIVE CORN-PLANTING METHODS.

   Location and climatic differences are no doubt responsible for the fact that three distinct planting methods were in vogue among the Indians. These were as follows: (1) The Hopi method; (2) the Omaha, or mound, method; and (3) the usual "hill" method.
   The Hopi and other tribes of the Southwest, in order to reach moist soil in the sandy areas which they cultivate, make use of the planting stick in planting. This stick is about 3 feet in length and has a stiltlike projection about 10 or 12 inches from the bottom. The stick is pressed into the soil with the foot, and holes are made from 8 to 12 inches in depth. Into these holes as many as 20 kernels are dropped. The hills are about 10 feet apart. The number of plants in the hill may seem excessive, but none are thinned out, being left as a protection against wind and sun.
   The Omaha, or mound, method was used by the Omaha Indians of Nebraska. In this method the earth was pulverized and heaped into mounds about 18 by 24 inches in area. The northern end of the mound was 18 inches in height, sloping to the south, the south end being level with the ground. The mounds were from 2 to 3 feet apart on all sides, and 7 kernels to the mound were planted. Sometimes a ditch was dug around the mound, into which water was poured in dry seasons.

 

     previous / next