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THE OLD AND THE NEW IN CORN CULTURE


THE OLD AND THE NEW
IN CORN CULTURE

Page

 
1

Corn The Great American Cereal
Corn and the Early Colonies

2 Corn and the Indian
3a Photos - Corn & Tools
3b Photos - Indians in corn fields
4a Photos - Corn Drying & Hopi field
4b Photos - Mortar and Pestles
5 Kinds of Corn Grown by the Indians.
6 Primitive Seed-testing Methods.
The Nettle Seed Tester
7 Primitive Corn-Planting Methods
8 Indian Cornfields
Primitive Tools
9 Plants as Indicators of the Season
10 Seed Selection and Storing
11

Indian Corn Foods

12

Primitive and Modern Methods of Culture
13 Corn and the Westward Movement
14 Corn and the Packing Industry
15 The Silo and the Corn Crop
16 Variations of the Corn Plant
17 Corn and the Struggle for Democracy

 

 

From the Yearbook of the United States Department of Agriculture 1918
page 16

By H. Howard Biggar,
Office of Corn Investigations, Bureau of Plant Industry.

VARIATIONS OF THE CORN PLANT.

   Whatever may have been the origin of corn, the fact remains that in its distribution over the United States it has undergone many and diverse modifications. Sturtevant reports heights of stalks varying from 18 inches for Golden Thumb pop corn to 22.25 feet for corn in Tennessee, and also reports individual ears with rows of kernels varying from 4 to 48. Variations in color are almost unlimited. Montgomery states that there are now probably 1,000 names varieties of corn in the United States, three-fourths of which have been developed since 1840. In 1898 Sturtevant listed 507 varieties.
   Corn has shown especial adaptability to differences in length of seasons, and at the present time we find varieties maturing in 80 days in the North and other varieties requiring 150 days or more in the South. The types, consisting of pop, flint, flour, dent, sweet, and pod corns, indicate great changes in centuries of adaptation. In addition to their natural variations, but few plants in America have received more attention at the hands of the plant breeder than corn.
   The plant breeder has found that plant to be very mobile, responding readily to selection. Proof of this is shown by the fact that selection has been found to influence the following characters: Shape of ear, height of ear, percentage of protein, percentage of oil, type of kernel, type of ear, width of leaves, color of kernel, size of cob, and many other characteristics. Through hybridization, valuable characters of different varieties have been brought together.

 

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