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THE OLD AND THE NEW IN CORN CULTURE


THE OLD AND THE NEW
IN CORN CULTURE

Page

 
1

Corn The Great American Cereal
Corn and the Early Colonies

2 Corn and the Indian
3a Photos - Corn & Tools
3b Photos - Indians in corn fields
4a Photos - Corn Drying & Hopi field
4b Photos - Mortar and Pestles
5 Kinds of Corn Grown by the Indians.
6 Primitive Seed-testing Methods.
The Nettle Seed Tester
7 Primitive Corn-Planting Methods
8 Indian Cornfields
Primitive Tools
9 Plants as Indicators of the Season
10 Seed Selection and Storing
11

Indian Corn Foods

12

Primitive and Modern Methods of Culture
13 Corn and the Westward Movement
14 Corn and the Packing Industry
15 The Silo and the Corn Crop
16 Variations of the Corn Plant
17 Corn and the Struggle for Democracy

 

 

From the Yearbook of the United States Department of Agriculture 1918
page 15

By H. Howard Biggar,
Office of Corn Investigations, Bureau of Plant Industry.

THE SILO AND THE CORN CROP.

.   No single agricultural step in marking the advance of methods of utilizing corn has been so important as the preservation of the crop in the green state in the silo. Between 1860 and 1870 the first silos for corn were used in Europe. The first record of silo construction in this country was in 1875, when two were built and used in Michigan. The days of experimentation with silage have now passed. Because it is an economical means of utilizing green feeds, especially corn, silage construction and the use of the silo are increasing rapidly, particularly in the dairy States. The following table shows the States leading in the number of silos:

Number of silos in the United States
[From the Monthly Crop Report, August, 1917, of the Bureau of Crop Estimates]

  Capacity (tons).  

State

Number of silos. Average

 

Total

 

 

New York
Pennsylvania
Ohio
Indiana
Illinois
Michigan
Wisconsin
Minnesota
Iowa
Missouri
Kansas
Kentucky
New England
All other

United States

55,000
24,000
25,000
27,000
30,000
33,000
55,000
15,000
16,000
13,000
11,000
10,000
35,000
55,000

404,000

 

75
65
67
70
79
70
87
95
105
90
106
80
67
77

78

 

4,125,000
1,560,000
1,675,000
1,890,000
2,370,000
2,310,000
4,785,000
1,425,000
1,680,000
1,170,000
1,166,000
800,000
2,345,000
4,235,000

31,536,000

 

 
   The average number of milch cows in the United States in the decade 1908 to 1917 was 20 per cent more than in the previous decade. A large part of this increase is no doubt due to the growing popularity of the silo as a cheap means of preserving green feeds.
 

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