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THE OLD AND THE NEW IN CORN CULTURE


THE OLD AND THE NEW
IN CORN CULTURE

Page

 
1

Corn The Great American Cereal
Corn and the Early Colonies

2 Corn and the Indian
3a Photos - Corn & Tools
3b Photos - Indians in corn fields
4a Photos - Corn Drying & Hopi field
4b Photos - Mortar and Pestles
5 Kinds of Corn Grown by the Indians.
6 Primitive Seed-testing Methods.
The Nettle Seed Tester
7 Primitive Corn-Planting Methods
8 Indian Cornfields
Primitive Tools
9 Plants as Indicators of the Season
10 Seed Selection and Storing
11

Indian Corn Foods

12

Primitive and Modern Methods of Culture
13 Corn and the Westward Movement
14 Corn and the Packing Industry
15 The Silo and the Corn Crop
16 Variations of the Corn Plant
17 Corn and the Struggle for Democracy

 

 

From the Yearbook of the United States Department of Agriculture 1918
page 14

By H. Howard Biggar,
Office of Corn Investigations, Bureau of Plant Industry.

CORN AND THE PACKING INDUSTRY

   The increasing production of corn and the consequent increase in hogs and cattle developed the packing-house industry. About 1832 the city of Cincinnati was nicknamed "Porkopolis" because of its importance as a pork-packing center. The Union Stock Yard and Transit Co. of Chicago began its operations in 1865. For a number of years it remained the only large market. In 1871, 1874, 1877, 1884, and 1898, stockyards were established at Kansas City, St. Louis, Sioux City, South Omaha, and St. Joseph. The growth of the packing industry has been indeed rapid. According to the Interstate Commerce Commission reports, there is a steady growth in the tonnage of packing-house products carried by the railways in the United States. For the years 1914, 1915, and 1916 the report of tonnage is as follows:

1914..........5,739,000 tons
1915..........6,193,623 tons
1916..........6,831,801 tons

   The increasing utilization of by-products of the packing houses is more or less familiar to all of us. As for the movement of live stock from the farms to various markets, live stock whose ration to a greater or less extent is corn, figures are so large as to be almost incomprehensible. According to the Bureau of Markets of the Department of Agriculture, the receipts of hogs during the 5 years from 1913 to 1917 at 12 leading markets averaged over 26,000,000 animals annually. The increase in receipts for this period over the previous 5 years is 14 per cent. In the year 1917 these same 12 markets received more than 14,000,000 cattle.

 

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