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THE OLD AND THE NEW IN CORN CULTURE


THE OLD AND THE NEW
IN CORN CULTURE

Page

 
1

Corn The Great American Cereal
Corn and the Early Colonies

2 Corn and the Indian
3a Photos - Corn & Tools
3b Photos - Indians in corn fields
4a Photos - Corn Drying & Hopi field
4b Photos - Mortar and Pestles
5 Kinds of Corn Grown by the Indians.
6 Primitive Seed-testing Methods.
The Nettle Seed Tester
7 Primitive Corn-Planting Methods
8 Indian Cornfields
Primitive Tools
9 Plants as Indicators of the Season
10 Seed Selection and Storing
11

Indian Corn Foods

12

Primitive and Modern Methods of Culture
13 Corn and the Westward Movement
14 Corn and the Packing Industry
15 The Silo and the Corn Crop
16 Variations of the Corn Plant
17 Corn and the Struggle for Democracy

 

 

From the Yearbook of the United States Department of Agriculture 1918
page 13

By H. Howard Biggar,
Office of Corn Investigations, Bureau of Plant Industry.

CORN AND THE WESTWARD MOVEMENT.

   The story of Indian corn is the story of the struggle of the human race for food in the Western Hemisphere. It is the story of definite rotations where corn is the cultivated crop. The dependence of the Indian upon corn, how it called into play his inventive genius, and its adoption as a crop and a food by the early colonists have been mentioned. Its popularity among the colonists resulted at last in a corn surplus, which was sent to the West Indies and South American in exchange for products of those countries.
   A steady influx of population along the Atlantic coast made more agricultural land necessary. The westward movement began, and settlements were made beyond the Alleghenies, where much of the oil was found to be especially suitable for corn production. The feeding of live stock began, and the surplus corn crop from west of the Alleghenies moved to the East in the shape of cattle and hogs. It was a not uncommon sight to see large droves of cattle and hogs being driven across the mountains from the Ohio Valley to Baltimore. Increasing trade with the eastern part of the United States and the beginnings of European trade made systems of transportation necessary. National highways were opened, canals were constructed, and at last railroads linked widely separated territory, so that the products of the West could reach quickly the eastern cities, the Atlantic seaboard, and the Orient.
   The progress of invention and commerce was hastened by rapidly increasing supplies of corn and corn-fed animals.

 

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