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The following recipes are taken from The Pure Food Cook Book Good Housekeeping Recipes edited by Mildred Maddocks, Introduction by Harvey W. Wiley M.D. 1915

Scalloped Sweet Potatoes

  Boil the potatoes, without peeling, until half done. Scrape off the skins while they are hot and leave them to get cold. Then cut into slices almost half an inch thick, and arrange in a buttered baking-dish, scattering bits of butter and a little sugar (a teaspoonful to the layer) between them. When the dish is filled in this order, pour in a cupful of boiling water in which a tablespoonful of butter has been melted. Cover with bread crumbs—dry and fine—dot these with butter, and sprinkle with salt and pepper. Cook, closely covered, for half an hour until brown. This is a Southern recipe and the product is delicious.

A Dixie Potato Pie

  To half a pint of fresh milk, add one cupful of sweet potatoes, well mashed, with one tablespoonful of butter, and one-eighth cupful of cream, or milk. Beat until this is light and creamy. Into this mixture beat very lightly the yolks of four eggs; add nutmeg and sugar to taste and the grated rind of one lemon or one small orange. A white meringue may be added to the top if desired.

Browned Sweet Potatoes

  Select potatoes of uniform size, and pare; place in a frying-pan, and add water to a depth of about one-half inch. Add one tablespoonful of butter or other shortening, and one tablespoonful of brown or white sugar. Cover and let boil furiously. The water will soon disappear as steam, and the potatoes will brown in the syrup that remains, which forms a delicious crust, keeping in the steam and flavor.

Apples and Sweet Potatoes

  Peeled, sliced apples, and sweet potatoes (the potatoes are previously boiled, peeled and sliced), arranged in alternate rows, are very good served with roast loin of pork or chops. Butter a shallow casserole, and lay enough butter over the potatoes and apples to moisten the whole. Serve in the dish in which they were baked. Add sugar if the apples are very tart.

Sweet Potato Waffles

  To one cupful of mashed sweet potatoes add one cupful of flour, one-fourth cupful of sugar, one cupful of milk, one-half cupful of melted butter, and two eggs, the whites and yolks beaten separately. Cook on a waffle iron.