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e-book:


The Flowers Personified


   

now available in paperback Volume I

click here for
more information

Flower Names
Flower Meaning
Flower Fairy Tales


The Flowers Personified introduction

The Flowers
The hand-colored plates

The Flower Fairy
How and why the Flowers became human

The Story of Two Shepherdesses,
the Blonde and the Brunette: and of a Queen of France

[1] [2] [3] [4] [5]
[6] [7] [8] [9] [10]
(Bluebottle, Corn poppy and Lily)

The Poet Jacobus Supposed He Had Found a Subject For An Epic Poem
(Pansy)  The secret language of flowers

Alphabetical list of Flower names in English, French & Latin with Meaning

Alphabetical list of Flower Meanings

Flora Timekeeping
Flora's Clock
The Floral Week
The Calendar of Flora

A Trick of the Flower Fairy
(Tobacco)

The Sultana Tulipia
[1] [2] [3] [4]
(Tulip)

Fragments Taken at Random from the album of the rose
[1] [2] [3] [4]
[5] [6] [7] [8] [9]
(Rose)

NARCISSA
(Daffodil)

Serious Displute In Relation to the Violet: Between The Flower Fairy and An Academy Which Prefers To Remain Anonymous.
(Violet)

SISTER NÉNUPHAR
(Water Lily)

CAMELLIA'S REGRETS

DAISY
MARGUERTINE The Oracle of the Meadows

CANZONE - The Flower of Forgetfulness

Flowers of the Ball-room

THE MYRTLE and THE LAUREL

PIANTO
The Everlasting Flower

Plates:
Differences in Plates

The Flowers

Differences in Bindings

 

 

THE POET JACOBUS

SUPPOSED HE HAD FOUND A SUBJECT FOR AN

EPIC POEM.

THE CHAPTER CONTAINS A SUMMARY OF EVERY THING WHICH THE ANCIENTS AND MODERNS HAVE WRITTEN ON THE LANGUAGE OF FLOWERS.

 I.

THE FLOWERS CONVERSE

           The Pansy* was wandering about the earth, not knowing where to find a home.

*La Pensée, --Thought.  “And there is pansies, that’s for thoughts.”  [Ophelia, in Hamlet.]

           She had knocked at door after door, and found no admittance. Then she offered herself as lady’s companion to a celebrated blue-stocking, and was refused.

           A philosopher of high renown declined receiving the Pansy, even as a housekeeper.

           Repulsed successively by an academician, a minister of state, a preacher, a painter, a novelist, and a sculptor, poor Pansy determined to leave the town, and resume her wanderings.

           It was a fine spring morning when she set out on her journey. She had not much to carry – but she was firm, resigned, and prepared to endure bravely the inconveniences of her lot.

           Plunged in meditation, the Pansy walked on, unconscious of the length of the way. Evening at length overtook her; she began to feel weary, and casting her eyes around, she looked for some place where she could seek refuge.

           She saw, at a short distance from the road, the front of a château brightly lighted up, and towards it she turned her steps. The owner, seated at his table, which was spread under a tent of silk upon the terrace, was singing, drinking, eating, and laughing with his friends.

           “Admit me,” said a feeble voice, which reached, nevertheless, the ears of the guests.

           “Who are you?” said the host. “if you are a merry companion, and know how to lighten the heavy hours, come in.”

           The voice replied, “I am the Pansy.”

           “Servants, shut the gates, Drive away this dull intruder – this troublesome companion, who causes us to remember. Let us forget! Let us forget!”

           The master of the château filled his cup, and drank to Forgetfulness.

           “I noticed, yonder, a modest cottage,” said the Pansy, who, to rest herself, had leaned for a moment upon a marble vase, that stood near the entrance of the château. “The poor are always hospitable: I will seek there a shelter for the night. I am fatigued, and begin to feel the cravings of hunger.”

Section 1 of 8    [2] [3] [4] [5] [6] [7] [8]

 

Pansy

click for larger image

Pansy, Pensée, Viola tricolor, Heartsease