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The Flowers Personified - The Poet Jacobus


now available in paperback Volume I

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Flower Names
Flower Meaning
Flower Fairy Tales


The Flowers Personified introduction

The Flowers
The hand-colored plates

The Flower Fairy
How and why the Flowers became human

The Story of Two Shepherdesses,
the Blonde and the Brunette: and of a Queen of France

[1] [2] [3] [4] [5]
[6] [7] [8] [9] [10]
(Bluebottle, Corn poppy and Lily)

The Poet Jacobus Supposed He Had Found a Subject For An Epic Poem
(Pansy)  The secret language of flowers

Alphabetical list of Flower names in English, French & Latin with Meaning

Alphabetical list of Flower Meanings

Flora Timekeeping
Flora's Clock
The Floral Week
The Calendar of Flora

A Trick of the Flower Fairy
(Tobacco)

The Sultana Tulipia
[1] [2] [3] [4]
(Tulip)

Fragments Taken at Random from the album of the rose
[1] [2] [3] [4]
[5] [6] [7] [8] [9]
(Rose)

NARCISSA
(Daffodil)

Serious Displute In Relation to the Violet: Between The Flower Fairy and An Academy Which Prefers To Remain Anonymous.
(Violet)

SISTER NÉNUPHAR
(Water Lily)

CAMELLIA'S REGRETS

DAISY
MARGUERTINE The Oracle of the Meadows

CANZONE - The Flower of Forgetfulness

Flowers of the Ball-room

THE MYRTLE and THE LAUREL

PIANTO
The Everlasting Flower

Plates:
Differences in Plates

The Flowers

Differences in Bindings

 

 

II.

WHERE WE SHOW THAT THE LANGUAGE OF FLOWERS MAY CAUSE A MAN TO LOSE THE TIP OF HIS NOSE.

           “I LOVED Jacobus, and Jacobus loved me. We were both young, handsome, sensible – and we had made a mutual engagement to live for each other. But unfortunately, the will of our relatives kept us apart. To correspond was our only consolation.”

          Madame Jacobus here heaved a sigh – and then resumed her narrative.

           “’Dearest,” said Jacobus one day to me, ‘we are beset with snares. How do we know that they will not, at some time, discover the hollow in the beech-tree, where we deposite our love-letters? That no unsafe person may get at our secret, I have brought you this little book, which will make you acquainted with a new language, unknown to the vulgar. Learn to read it, and above all, to write it accurately.’

           “I took the book. Its title was – ‘The Language of Flowers: in a course of twelve lessons."

           “With what earnestness did I devote myself to this study! To confess the truth, the language of flowers does not, at first, seem very difficult. The verb has but three persons – the first, the second, and the third, -- I, thou, he.

          “It is thus conjugated: --

          “I love. We present the flower horizontally, with the right hand.

          “Thou lovest. The same flower in the same hand, but inclined a little to the left.

          “He loves. The same flower is offered with the left hand.

“Two flowers denote the plural. A flower inverted means denial. Thus a yellow asphodel, with its head downwards and its stem up, signifies – ‘I do not regret you.’

“There are three tenses, -- the present, the past, and the future.

          “We express the present, by handing the flower on a level with the heart; we denote the past, when we present it with the hand inclined downwards, -- and the future, with the hand raised as high as the eyes.

          “If a substantive be used in place of the verb, we conjugate the flower with an auxiliary. Thus, the jessamine is the symbol of amiability. Presented upright, and in the right hand, it means – ‘I think you amiable.’ Presented to the left, in the same hand, it means – ‘You think me amiable.’ How fully, Jacobus, was your father a jessamine to me!

  Section 1 of 5:  [2] [3] [4] [5]