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The Flowers Personified


Section 2

 
THE POET JACOBUS SUPPOSED HE HAD FOUND A SUBJECT FOR AN EPIC POEM.
II. Where we show that the language of flowers may cause a man to lose the tip of his nose.

[1] [2] [3] [4] [5]

 

“Love had very soon engraved these principles upon my memory. In summer, a nosegay in my bosom revealed to him every thought. In the winter, when we have flowers no longer, their names, written on paper, made known to us the state of our affairs. About this time, Jacobus was preparing to set out for Paris, that he might see an uncle on whom our union depended. I still remember the note which he wrote to me at that time: --

          “’Wormwood can do nothing against the real acacia. You know that I have a dragon of whortleberry. Away with the hollow-root! Lion anemone, they acacia is in the American aloe. Banish the king’s spear, and think of the mugwort of our next interview.

“’The myrtle as high as the heart, and the myrtle as high as the eyes, forever.

“’Jacobus.’

          “It was unnecessary for me to look into the dictionary, in order to translate this billet at once.

          “’Absence has no power over genuine love. You know that I hate treachery. But away with all weakness! Rest assured that your love is in safe keeping. Banish all regret, and think of our happiness when we shall again see one another.

          “’I love you, and shall love you always.

 “’Jacobus.’

 

“This letter fell into the hands of my guardian. But it was all Greek to him.

“I blessed the language of flowers, and I continued to study it with still greater ardor, when it came near depriving me of a husband, and you, Jacobus, of a father.”

          Here Jacobus thought it his duty to wipe off a tear.