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e-book:


The Flowers Personified


   

now available in paperback Volume I

click here for
more information

Flower Names
Flower Meaning
Flower Fairy Tales


The Flowers Personified introduction

The Flowers
The hand-colored plates

The Flower Fairy
How and why the Flowers became human

The Story of Two Shepherdesses,
the Blonde and the Brunette: and of a Queen of France

[1] [2] [3] [4] [5]
[6] [7] [8] [9] [10]
(Bluebottle, Corn poppy and Lily)

The Poet Jacobus Supposed He Had Found a Subject For An Epic Poem
(Pansy)  The secret language of flowers

Alphabetical list of Flower names in English, French & Latin with Meaning

Alphabetical list of Flower Meanings

Flora Timekeeping
Flora's Clock
The Floral Week
The Calendar of Flora

A Trick of the Flower Fairy
(Tobacco)

The Sultana Tulipia
[1] [2] [3] [4]
(Tulip)

Fragments Taken at Random from the album of the rose
[1] [2] [3] [4]
[5] [6] [7] [8] [9]
(Rose)

NARCISSA
(Daffodil)

Serious Displute In Relation to the Violet: Between The Flower Fairy and An Academy Which Prefers To Remain Anonymous.
(Violet)

SISTER NÉNUPHAR
(Water Lily)

CAMELLIA'S REGRETS

DAISY
MARGUERTINE The Oracle of the Meadows

CANZONE - The Flower of Forgetfulness

Flowers of the Ball-room

THE MYRTLE and THE LAUREL

PIANTO
The Everlasting Flower

Plates:
Differences in Plates

The Flowers

Differences in Bindings

 

 

CANZONE.


THE FLOWER OF FORGETFULNESS.

          We should avoid the flower of forgetfulness. We ought never to inhale its deceptive odor.

           It is beautiful and smiling. It looks at you with its soft eye. It seems to speak, and to say to you: – “Approach: I am your friend: I will give you comfort.”

           Do you know the hunter Ulric? He has plucked the flower of oblivion.

           At first, a profound quiet succeeded to his sufferings, and he could look back without pain on that which had afflicted him.

           Ulric is now tired of indifference, and whishes again to love: but he has plucked the flower of forgetfulness.

           We never love again, when we have once forgotten.

           Ulric wanders through the forest – he traverses the plain – and he climbs the mountain. He inquires of the bird in the thicket, of the flower in the furrow, and the rill in the mountain, why he, alone can no longer love. The bird, the flower, and the rill reply: “thou hast gathered the flower of forgetfulness.”

           The hunter now regrets the time when he was unhappy. At least, he could then feel his heart beat.

           “Alas!” he exclaimed, “there are then evils from which one is relieved, only to suffer more.”

           We must avoid the flower of forgetfulness: we must not even inhale its deceptive odor.

           Tell me, dear friend, tell me its name, that I may know it when I meet with it.

           Some have called it moonwort. But men are unacquainted with its true name. It has no name for them. It is called simply the flower of forgetfulness.

           Where does it grow? In the wheat-fields yellow with summer harvest; in the crevices of the old castle; in the midst of wide meadows; under arbors; or far, far down below, in the mystic country of the genii?

           No, no, fair youth. In the depths of the heart lies hidden the germ of that everlasting flower – the flower of oblivion.