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Ministry of Agriculture Allotment & Garden Guide


 

Ministry of Agriculture Allotment and Garden Guide January 1945 page 7

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facsimile of page 7

January 1945

Page:
1 / 2 / 3 / 4 /

5 / 6 / 7 / 8

 

Ministry of Agriculture
Allotment & Garden Guides Index

January 1945

February 1945

March 1945

April 1945

May 1945

June 1945

July 1945

August 1945

September 1945

October 1945

November 1945

December 1945


The Allotment DVD
The delights of having an allotment. 15 programmes as seen on ITV. Suit new and established growers. Seasonal guide, top gardening tips, fascinating food facts and insights into what's really in those sheds! 

THE ALLOTMENT SERIES was first shown on ITV 1 West
 

Allotments UK and other related allotment links

 

           
   

LOOK AFTER YOUR TOOLS

 
         The wise gardener will examine his tools now and see if any need to be replaced. If so, he will buy them now. Retailers cannot get supplies easily, and if you put off buying until the last minute you may find the tools are not available until it is too late.
     A little care is well worth while. Many a tool has had years taken off its useful life by being allowed to rust in a damp shed. No good gardener lets his tools rust, for he knows they take more energy to use when their surfaces are dull.

drawing showing cleaning garden tools

  Here are a few tips for keeping them in first-class order :

* Never put your garden tools away dirty. Wash off any soil adhering to them and dry them with an old cloth.

* Always wipe them over with an oily rage before putting them away.

* Don't leave them lying about where they may rust or rot.

The best way to keep them in good condition is to use them often.

LOOK AT YOUR STORED CROPS

     Inspect all crops you have in store. Potatoes, onions, shallots, carrots, beet and turnips should be looked at every few weeks, just to make certain that they are safe from frost, wet, rats and other enemies, removing any that show the first signs of decay.

 
   
 
   

Look to your
FRUIT TREES & BUSHES

 
         Earlier in this "Guide" we have advised you to prune and spray your fruit trees and bushes before the end of January.
     Pruning fruit trees is a complicated job ; if you have never done it you would be well advised to get a friend fairly skilled at the job to prune your trees for you. Watch him carefully while he is doing it and get him to explain why he is making the various cuts, so that you will get to know how to do it yourself. Very often more damage is done by unwise pruning than if the trees were left unpruned, and it is necessary to know a little about the reasons for pruning before starting. Briefly, the aim is to train the tree into a good shape, to prevent it from becoming a tangled mass of branches that would exclude light and air and to encourage the

drawing of fruit tree branch showing pruning cuts

production of fruit buds and regular cropping.
     Pruning bush fruits is usually somewhat easier than pruning tree fruits.
     You will find "Dig for Victory" leaflet No. 25 of some help in pruning both trees and bushes. It is illustrated and you can get a free copy from the Ministry at the address given on page 8.

 
             
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